Articles Tagged with nyc elder law attorney

Executing a will or estate through probate court can be a costly, time consuming process full of surprises and complex issues. On top of that, the probate process creates a public record of the proceedings that may reveal information individuals wish to keep private, including debts, real estate holdings, and prenuptial agreement agreements.

Fortunately, New York probate law gives individuals planning their estate options to avoid this burdensome process by creating living trusts, setting up joint ownership, and various transfer agreements. However, even these options come with various challenges that can complicate what is meant to be a less stressful process.

By thinking ahead, weighing options, and speaking to an experienced estate planning attorney, individuals and couples can tailor a plan that best suits their needs and ensures their final wishes are carried out with the greatest benefit to survivors. Here are some common ways to avoid probate court in New York.

As our parents age, many of us begin to take on greater roles concerning basic needs like overseeing finances, medical care, and other tasks. Often times, some form of guardianship is necessary to ensure our loved one’s best interests are executed by financial institutions, hospitals, and even local governments. Even loved ones capable of handling many responsibilities themselves can use assistance from family members.

Fortunately, New York elder law gives family members the right to step in and request guardianship as well as allow competent elders the right to agree to guardianship and allow a family member to make certain decisions on their behalf. Whether you find yourself in either circumstance, an experienced and dedicated New York elder law attorney can help the process goes as smoothly as possible and your beloved elder has his or her needs met.

New York guardianship elder laws

When determining how you want your estate and assets administered upon your death, it is also important to consider how you want decisions made in the event that you cannot make them for yourself. Naming a power of attorney has a number of benefits that will avoid any drawn out court proceedings to name an agent in the event of your incapacitation. Power of attorney documents name an individual, also known as an agent, to perform specific tasks when you cannot. These powers can vary, as there is medical/health care power of attorney and also property or financial power of attorney powers.

Medical power of attorney gives an individual the ability to make your health care decisions, such as where you should receive care, if you should receive a specific treatment in the event your wishes are not listed, as well as dealing with your insurance and medical premiums. Financial powers of attorney allow an individual, upon a specific event, to handle a variety of your financial matters on your behalf. While many people will name someone as power of attorney in the event of incapacitation, some will name a power of attorney to take effect immediately, thus, delegating decision making power.

These situations are predisposed to undue influence, something the court is very suspect of and will closely monitor in the event they believe an individual is abusing their power of attorney role over an elderly individual. In the event that you are competent and have named someone as a power of attorney, but due to a number of circumstances, including the end to a relationship or a possibility of undue influence, you wish to revoke the power of attorney, you can do so by delivering a notice to the power of attorney, your estate attorney, as well as other interested parties notified of the document.

Aging comes with a number of considerations, including how to deal with ailments, conditions associated with older age, as well as how method of treatment is best for you or a close loved one. Today, there are an overwhelming amount of options to choose from when it comes to pain management and treatment for chronic conditions, however, many of them can become very addictive. One somewhat controversial treatment option for pain management being used by a number of elderly citizens is the use of medical marijuana.

Although the use of marijuana whether medicinally or recreationally is illegal under federal law, over half of the states have decriminalized and now approved it for use medicinally. Based on numerous studies and research, it has been shown that as compared to other pain management treatments, the use of marijuana leaves less risk for addiction, fewer side effects, as well as allowing individuals to still go about their daily lives while managing health issues. Health issues associated with aging include autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis, arthritis, as well as cancer, dementia and Parkinson’s disease, which have all been approved under conditions managed using medicinal marijuana.

While the current elderly population has been somewhat skeptical of what they have known as an illegal drug being approved for use in the medical setting, as more states make it legal for use, approval among the older generations increases. Since many seniors are seeking to determine if use of marijuana is suitable for their condition, many nursing homes and assisted living facilities have had to come up with their own policies, either endorsing or shaming it’s use. Almost a dozen nursing homes in the state of Washington have amended their policies to respond to the demand for approval of medical marijuana as treatment in their facilities.

Recent Recalls

Open heart surgery has saved the lives of thousands of patients across America, as well as the world. Performing this task takes a highly skilled team of doctors well equipped with the right medical devices to assist them. All of these tools require FDA approval and specific cleaning procedures prior to their implementation during surgery. The Center of Disease Control and Prevention announced that a heater cooler unit that has been used in the majority of these surgeries since 2012, could have been contaminated when it was in the manufacturing process.

Heater Cooler Units for Open Heart Surgery

When we place our loved ones in the care of a nursing home we expect that they will be properly treated and cared for. Sadly, there are many instances where negligent care is given. In one recent case, a nursing home resident was seriously injured after being scaled by hot water that was spilled on her. The woman’s health declined and she died. A representative for the woman’s estate has filed a lawsuit in stating that they did not provide proper care to her.

Burns Can Be Serious

Burns to the skin can occur for a number of reasons. In this case, the woman suffered burns due to hot water that was spilled. The nursing home staff allegedly did not properly supervise the woman while under their care. The woman sustained severe physical injuries that contributed to her death. Burns are painful, and may become infected, causing other medical problems. In this instance, the lawsuit alleges that the burns were quite severe and indeed led to the woman’s decline in health, and subsequent death.

A study released in late November in the JAMA Internal Medicine journal reported that dementia rates for individuals over the age of 65 years old is down almost 24% from rates found in 2000. There are a variety of reasons why this decline may have happened, including elders with higher education levels than those before them, as well as better heart and brain monitoring, and more awareness as to social and behavioral changes that elders have as a way to combat Alzheimer’s Disease.

This news comes as a welcome surprise, as in 2016, 5.4 million Americans lives with Alzheimer’s Disease, roughly translating to one in nine people over the age of 65 years old. By 2050, the elder population will have tripled in size, amounting to a staggering 84 million people over the age of 65 years old. With the aging population growing at such a rapid pace, medical, legal and social professionals are working to determine how to cope with such a large amount of the population potentially living with this disease.

These recent findings shed some light on how the disease, which generally exhibits symptoms of memory loss, confusion, limited social skills, mood changes and disorders as the result of irritability and anxiety, as well as confused speech and muscular movement.

Trustees serve a very important role in the effective administration of a trust. The maker of the trust document, the grantor, gives another neutral third party, the power to administer the terms of the trust throughout the lifetime of the grantor and after, if the terms of the trust provide so. The trustee is essentially in charge of managing all the assets of the trust, without taking an interest in them. While a trustee can also be the maker of the trust, many people elect another individual, or a corporate trustee to continue administering the trust upon their death.

There are some express terms that a trustee must follow, such as:

  • Keeping separate the investments and accounts of the trust,

New York Statute

In February 2011, New York amended the Palliative Care Information Act, requiring doctors and nurse practitioners to inform terminally-ill patients about end of life options and counseling regarding palliative care. To receive palliative care information under the New York statute, the patient must reasonably be expected to be within the last six months of his or her life, a standard that is commonly associated with hospice care. The information provided to the terminally ill patients includes their diagnosis and the likely course of the disease, the options that would be available to treat the disease, risks and benefits of those options, and their legal rights to pain and symptom management during their final months. If the patient lacks decision making capacity, their appointed proxy or representative must be provided with the information.

Hospice versus Palliative Care

While most of us know that the baby boomer population is vast, many do not realize the impact this population will have as they start to retire over the next few decades. In fact, over the next 20 years, 10,000 baby boomers will turn 65 everyday. Between 65-70 years old has been the age of retirement for many, with some retiring early and some pushing through another decade of work. However, as this generation gets older, their need for care will continue to grow.

Federal Level

In late June, the Supreme Court decided not to hear Home Care Association of America v. Weil, a case that was attempting to deprive home care workers of their ability to qualify for minimum wage and additionally, for overtime pay for those hours worked over 40 per week. These home care workers have been part of the ‘Fight for 15’ movement to get equal pay and higher pay for minimum wage. Home care workers have previously been labeled by the Labor Department as ‘companions,’ which does not allow them to qualify as employees who are subject to minimum wage and overtime pay. The rules governing home care workers were not fixed until this past year, when the Labor Department determined that home care employers needed to follow the same rules as any other employer and pay their employees according to minimum wage standards.

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