The Basics – Nursing Home Abuse: Signs and How to Stop It

Many of our elderly adults end up in nursing homes or assisted living, whether as a result of an accident or due to a declining ability to care for themselves. While many have family members or friends who are able to ensure their loved one is being taken care of properly in their respective homes, not all of those elderly are fortunate to have someone to look after them. In fact, the Special Investigations Division of the House Government Reform Committee found that 30% of nursing homes in the United States were cited for nearly 10,000 instances of abuse over a two year period.


Abuse in a nursing home can take many forms, some problems involving physical abuse and negligent include untreated bedsores, inadequate medical care through dehydration and improper hygiene, as well as physical abuse such as broken bones, untreated bruises and cuts. Other examples of abuse involve verbal abuse, for example yelling, and ignoring requests, as well as withholding medication.


This problem happens all too often, and it can come down to the caretakers word against the elderly abused patient. An Illinois man concerned about the care of his father after he voiced concerns about a new nurse, installed a surveillance camera in his father’s room in an assisted living home. The camera unfortunately confirmed exactly what he believed, he was being neglected at times, verbally and physically abused by a certified nurse’s aid working at the facility. The nurse was charged with a felony aggravated battery to a person older than 60 years and felony abuse of a long-term health care facility resident.


While this proved effective for bringing charges against the nurse, the nurse is arguing that the video evidence violates the Illinois Authorized Electronic Monitoring in Long Term Care Facilities Act that was enacted in January 2016. This law finds that if a long term care facility resident seeks to install a surveillance camera, they must first notify the facility in writing of the act. The family is fighting back to bring the video evidence into court. While the court may allow it in, this provides a learning lesson for those considering the same in order to monitor the care of their loved ones.

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